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Healthy Living

  • Success Stories
  • The Goal
  • The Strategies
  • Current Reality
  • Healthy Eating
  • Active Living
  • Breastfeeding
  • Farmer's Market
  • Community Garden
  • Worksite Wellness
  • Other Healthy Living Initiatives

Farmers' Market

What better way to promote healthy eating in the community than by hosting a farmers’ market?

The Bridgeport Farmer's Market, is held on Wednesday evenings from 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. It is located at 409 N Main. For more information call (308) 279-0509 or visit their facebook page.

The Chadron Farmer's Market runs from the first Saturday of June until the last Saturday in October, and is held every Saturday morning from 8 a.m. to noon. It is located outside the Dawes County Courthouse. For more information, contact Karen at (308) 432-4401.

The Crawford Farmer's Market is held every Saturday morning starting at 8 a.m., and takes place at the yard of 229 Main Street. For more information, contact Becky Windland at (308) 665-5150

The Garden County Farmers’ Market, which is put on by Oshkosh, Lewellen, and Lisco, runs from August 10 until the last weekend of September. The Market is held on Saturday mornings from 8 a.m. to noon at Oshkosh City Park. For more information, contact Shelli Peterson at (308) 778-6390.

The Gering community has been promoting healthy eating by selling homegrown produce in their summer farmers’ market through the Community Action Partnership of Western Nebraska (CAPWN). The market runs until August 13, and is held every Thursday evening from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. It is located in front of the CAPWN Ever Green House. For more information, contact Tracey Gifford at (308) 631-4660.

The Gordon Farmers’ Market starts the last Saturday in June, and is held every Saturday morning at 3rd and Main. For more information, contact David Kayton at (308) 360-0591.

The Hemingford Farmers’ Market is a one day event "A Day in the Park" on August 2. 

The Morrill Farmers’ Market starts July 16, and is held on Tuesday evenings from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. It is located on the east side of Morrill across from Subway.  For more information, contact Cheryl Averill at (308) 247-2475.

The Rushville Farmers’ Market is held on Tuesday evenings starting at 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. at at Pocket Park located on US HWY 20 and Main Street. For more information, contact David Kayton at (308) 360-0591.

The Scottsbluff Downtown Association summer farmers’ market, also known as 18th Street Farmers’ Market, runs from the beginning of June until the end of September. The Market is held rain or shine on Saturday mornings from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Vendors can pay for a single or a double space for either one weekend, or for the entire early/regular season. All they need to bring are tables, chairs, tents, and displays for their spaces, as well as a way of securing their tents. The Market is located in downtown Scottsbluff on 18th and Broadway. For more information, contact Market Manager Kat Taylee at (308) 225-0822, or by email at kathi@openabar2ranch.com.

The Sidney Farmers’ Market is held at Hickory Street Square every Saturday from 8am to 11am starting June 29 and going to the end of October. Anyone who is interested can pay $5 per Saturday for a spot to sell their items. If someone has already been a vendor twice, they can get a spot for free on the last Saturday of each month. Margaret Lienemann, who is in charge of the farmers’ market in Sidney, says, “We welcome all fresh produce, fruits and vegetables, and crafts.” For a contract or for more information, contact Margaret at (308)254-7343.



 

Communities across the panhandle are making it easier for the people in their community to obtain fresh produce by providing community garden plots.  Community gardens are a proven strategy to increase access to affordable fruits and vegetables. 

The Hemingford Community Garden is located by the Hemingford ball fields off Wyoming Street. The size of these free plots varies according to the space available, and the water is provided by the city.  Contact Kathi Chatelain at (308) 487-3304 if you are interested.”

The Alliance Comminity Garden is located at the 2700 block of Big Horn Avenue. A 200 square feet plot sells for $30, and a 400 square feet plot can be purchased for $50. Call (308) 762-5400 if you are interested.

The Chadron Community Garden is located at the 800 block of West 6th Street. A plot is $20, and the water is provided at no charge. Contact Barb McDaniel at (308) 432-0505 if you are interested.

 

Gering has made it easier for the people in their community to obtain fresh produce by selling plots in their community garden through the Community Action Partnership of Western Nebraska (CAPWN) Ever Green House. A 15’x20’ plot is $20, and the water is already paid for.  The garden is located on the north side of the Green House at 1210 D Street in Gering. The Community Ever Green House is heated using black barrels filled with water that are  heated by the sun.  Starter plants come from there for use in the community garden. Contact Chris Holcomb at (308) 635-7298 if you are interested.

 

 

 

 

The people of Lewellen have come together to promote healthy living through the Lewellen Community Garden.  Though there is at least one AmeriCorp member and one volunteer “assigned” every year to help maintain it, the garden is open to the public, and anyone in town who wants to help plant, water, and weed can do so. Also, the entire town has access to the fresh fruits and vegetables that are produced. The garden was started four years ago by the church and Volunteers of America as an effort to utilize a space that was empty at the time. They decided that a community garden was a great way to use the combined efforts and resources of the town in order to provide some healthy food options for them at a limited cost. For more information, contact Rachel Sissel at Volunteers of America either by phone, (308)778-5548, or by email, rsissel@voa.org.

A proven strategy to improve the community’s health is for worksites to ensure access to and promote healthy food including fruits, vegetables and water, and at the same time limiting access to sugar sweetened beverages.  This can be achieved through the adoption of policies and guidelines for staff meetings, company sponsored events, and food options in the cafeteria and vending machines.  It is also helpful if worksites are able to make kitchen equipment available for employee food storage and cooking use.  For more information and technical assistance contact Panhandle Worksite Wellness Council Coordinator, Jessica Davies at jdavies@pphd.org or 308-487-3600 ext. 101.

Box Butte General Hospital Wellness Program:   Eat Right Menu Campaign BBGH learned that they didn’t need to force their employees to eat better and ultimately most of them had the education to make healthy choices, but it wasn’t until it was the “easy choice” that our employees started doing this frequently. The lesson learned is that the easier it is to do something positive, the more likely your employees are willing to do it. Goal:  To improve the cafeteria environment to one that would encourage and promote employees and community members to select the healthy nutrition options. A promotion campaign was developed by the wellness committee and lead by the wellness coordinator and BBGH’s registered dietitian.  This campaign included better marketing and promotion of an already existing “eat right menu” which is a menu of lighter foods that are more nutritious and healthier than other cafeteria food options.

 

Cabela's – Healthy vending options In an effort to increase employee access to healthy food and beverage options at work, Cabela's has begun transitioning employee break rooms into areas that offer healthier alternatives to traditional highly processed, calorie-dense food. Refrigerated vending and other break room supports have been proven to impact healthful employee eating habits.

 

 

 

 

PPHD – Healthy meeting guidelines Adopting healthy meeting guidelines at company-sponsored functions is an excellent way to reinforce your worksite's culture of wellness. Panhandle Public Health District has guidelines for all functions including training opportunities through the Panhandle Partnership for Health and Human Service and WNCC Training Academy. The lovely fruit kabobs to the left are just one example of food offered at such meetings.

 

 

 

Chadron Community Hospital has been making dietary changes over the last few years to promote and improve the health of their employees. In their cafeteria, they have reduced portion sizes, increased healthy options in the salad bar, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans, and have reduced fattening ingredients such as mayonnaise in the salads they serve. They have also ensured that a second, healthy entrée is always available, and that their “Brown Bag” take-out lunches are full of healthy items.  Other dietary changes to the hospital include cutting their pop offerings in half and preparing healthy snacks in which fresh fruit is always offered. Also, they have introduced a vending machine full of healthy items, including nuts, cheese, fruit, and sandwiches. The snacks in this machine are always sold at or below cost to the public.  For more information on worksite wellness at Chadron Community Hospital, contact Jody Young, the Dietary Manager at the hospital, at dietary1@chadronhospital.com.

dd Bountiful Baskets in the Panhandle

Every other Monday, community members go to the website http://www.bountifulbaskets.org/ to participate in that week’s delivery.  On Saturday the semi arrives, volunteers unload their order and distribute into baskets where then in about 15-20 minutes those who have participated for the week take home a laundry basket full of fruits and vegetables for $15.00.  There are always special offerings each time like whole grain breads, or a case of broccoli or apricots.  Those items cost extra, but are very affordable.

No one makes money or is paid for their volunteer time.  Participants pay the $15 when they sign up on line, so there is no exchange of money locally.

Sites in the Panhandle include Harrison, Chadron, Hemingford, Alliance, Bayard, and Dalton.  With sites soon to open in Crawford, Lewellen,  Scottsbluff and a second one in Chadron.  At each site there are nearly 100 people participating.  One participant was overheard to say, “My family has eaten more fruits and vegetables than ever before since we started getting bountiful baskets!”

A factor that makes it more difficult to eat healthy is the cost of fresh produce. 

This cost is especially high for rural communities without large, well-known grocery stores.  An important resource for people who do not have access to fresh fruits and vegetables is the Food Pantry at Volunteers of America in Lewellen. Instead of just providing canned and preserved foods for low-income families, Volunteers of America (VOA) works very hard to keep their shelves always stocked with fresh produce. This is made possible with the help of Walmart, who cleans out their extra produce every week and gives it to food pantries in the area. The Pantry also gets food from food drives put on by Churches and Youth Groups and from the Food Bank of the Heartland in Omaha. Rose Brassfield is in charge of the Food Pantry in Lewellen. “The food pantry is my passion,” says Rose. “I work very hard to help everyone I can.” Since a large percent of the community is in need of the Pantry (an estimated 12% of Garden County is described as ‘”food insecure”), she usually gets 5,000 to 7,000 pounds of food per order. The Food Pantry is available to anyone who needs it whenever VOA is open, usually from 8 am to 6 pm Monday through Friday. There are even “Diabetes Boxes” full of food geared especially for those with diabetes. For more information, contact Rose at rabrassfield@yahoo.com.

Garden County High School in Oshkosh has been doing its part in promoting healthy eating to its students and the surrounding community.

The students have built an underground greenhouse where they can grow their own fruits and vegetables to eat and sell to the community. The greenhouse was funded by a number of grants coming from the Turner Board Foundation, the P 16 Initiative, the Nebraska Academy of Sciences, and local donors. The structure of the greenhouse is based off the design of Russell Finch, Nebraska’s largest citrus grower. Sarah Paisley is in charge of the upkeep of the greenhouse over the summer, and says, “Our biggest goal is to become self-sufficient.” For more information or to set up a time for a tour of the underground greenhouse, contact Sarah at spaisley@gceagles.org.

NDPP logo

National Diabetes Prevention Program in the Panhandle

This program is offered in communities throughout the Panhandle to help people improve their health, lose weight, and reduce thier risk of developing diabetes. We are seeing tremendous success in the Panhandle with this program; people are losing weight and changing their lives. This program is for people who have a body mass index (BMI) of 24 or higher, have prediabetes or have been told by a doctor that they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Losing 7% of your body weight reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 %. For more information contact: Tabi Prochazka, Regional Lifestyle Coordinator tprochazka@pphd.org or 308-487-3600 ext 107.

 

  • Worksite Wellness
  • Other Active Living Initiatives

A proven strategy to improve the community’s health is for worksites to provide and enhance their supports for physical activity.  This can be achieved through the adoption of policies and guidelines that incorporate wellness and healthy lifestyles into their business models.  Some examples are:

  • encouraging staff to walk during their break times by mapping out routes with their distances and posting in a prominent location
  • providing a walking path near the worksite for employee use   
  • providing on site exercise equipment, such as a TREK desk where employees can walk and work simultaneously
  • providing bike racks at work to encourage active transportation

For more information and technical assistance contact Panhandle Worksite Wellness Council Coordinator, Jessica Davies at jdavies@pphd.org or 308-487-3600 ext. 101.

d d d d dd

   
   
WilsonPark

Walking trails and outdoor exercise equipment

What could be more inviting than a trail in the great outdoors as a safe place to walk?  Add to that some outdoor exercise equipment and you have a winning combination!  Chadron is fortunate to have two trails, one at Wilson Park and the other on the Chadron State College Campus, that are for public use.  A few years ago a collaborative group was awarded funds from Blue Cross Blue Shield to install outdoor exercise equipment on both of the trails.  The group also designed brochures with distance information and maps.  This is an example of the difference that the Lifespan Wellness Team is making to create a healthier community.  For more information contact:  Sandy Roes, Chadron Community Hospital director@wchr.net, 308-747-2409.

BikeRack

Bike Racks

Everywhere you look in downtown Chadron you are apt to find a bicycle rack.  The purpose is to encourage active transportation by riding a bike to run errands rather than to jump in the car.  This idea culminated from the Dawes Joint Planning meetings as well as an assessment completed by UNL students which included a walkability/rideability study of existing sidewalks.  The group came up with a design, found a local business to manufacture the bike racks, and even provided initial funds for sharing some of the costs for the early adopters of the movement.  Thanks to the local businesses for providing the bike racks as a support to encourage physical activity!  For more information contact:  Sandy Roes, Chadron Community Hospital director@wchr.net, 308-747-2409.

NDPP logo

National Diabetes Prevention Program in the Panhandle

This program is offered in communities throughout the Panhandle to help people improve their health, lose weight, and reduce thier risk of developing diabetes. We are seeing tremendous success in the Panhandle with this program; people are losing weight and changing their lives. This program is for people who have a body mass index (BMI) of 24 or higher, have prediabetes or have been told by a doctor that they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Losing 7% of your body weight reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 %. For more information contact: Tabi Prochazka, Regional Lifestyle Coordinator tprochazka@pphd.org or 308-487-3600 ext 107.

 

d

Regional West Medical Center recognizes the importance of breastfeeding in keeping young children healthy by implementing employee and maternity care practices that encourage breastfeeding.

The maternity care practices include prenatal breastfeeding classes, lactation nurses in Labor/Delivery and NICU, referral to community peer support networks, latching on within two hours of birth, and skin to skin contact to make it more likely that the newborn will latch on well and without any help. In addition,  Regional West provides reasonable breaks for employees to express breast milk for one year after the child is born.

d

Community Action Partnership in Western Nebraska and Western Community Health Resources have been encouraging breastfeeding by providing breastfeeding peer support for their clients.

Since new mothers’ preferred resource for questions about child rearing is other mothers, the peer support is provided by mothers who have experience with breastfeeding and have undergone specific training, and encourages and supports both pregnant women and those who have already started breastfeeding. Individual counseling and mother-to-mother support groups are also offered.  Since women’s social networks are highly influential, they can be good sources of encouragement for breastfeeding.

d

Box Butte General Hospital has made the comfort of nursing employees and patients a priority.

“At Box Butte General Hospital & Clinics we support breastfeeding because research indicates that both moms and babies are healthier throughout their lives as a result of breastfeeding.”  They have set aside a lactation room for nursing mothers who are either employees, patients, or visitors of the hospital.  The room provides a private, quiet space for mothers to breastfeed, as well as a pump and a refrigerator to store breast milk for later use. The hospital also offers a Breastfeeding Support Group for interested mothers that takes place in the Sand Hills Room in the Medical Arts Plaza, located at 2109 Box Butte Ave. The Support Group takes place on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 pm, and is led by two lactation counselors, Lisa Splattstoesser and Erica Muhr. For more information, contact Lisa at (308) 760-7558 or Erica at (308) 762-1774.

d

An important part of the Panhandle Community Health Improvement Plan is the encouragement of breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding has many advantages over feeding babies with formula. Some of these include a decrease in asthma and allergies in the baby, a decrease in obesity in the baby, a decrease in the weight put on by the mother because of the baby, and an increase in bonding between mother and child as oxytocin is released.  Mothers returning to work are presented with an additional barrier of expressing milk while away from their baby and returning to work is continually cited as the leading reason for mothers to wean their baby early.  To provide moms additional support, Chadron Community Hospital provides a room for employees to express their milk on paid break during the work day. 
This room includes a chair, sink, fridge, and pump for mothers to use. The hospital also gives a class on breastfeeding and its benefits to patients who are new mothers. One thing the hospital is working toward is more assistance for mothers after they have left the hospital. For more information, contact Rose Fryda, Infection Control Nurse.

d

Sidney Regional Medical Center – Employee breastfeeding room and policy

Breastfeeding-friendly worksites are not only in compliance with the Fair Labor Standards Act but provide an essential support for employees returning to work after having a baby. Sidney Regional Medical Center recently adopted a policy and created a room for nursing mothers. Additionally, the hospital is working diligently to make SRMC a baby-friendly hospital through the World Health Organization/UNICEF. For more information contact: Jessica Davies jdavies@pphd.org, 308-487-3600 ext 101.

Regional West Medical Center recognizes the importance of breastfeeding in keeping young children healthy by implementing employee and maternity care practices that encourage breastfeeding.

The maternity care practices include prenatal breastfeeding classes, lactation nurses in Labor/Delivery and NICU, referral to community peer support networks, latching on within two hours of birth, and skin to skin contact to make it more likely that the newborn will latch on well and without any help. In addition,  Regional West provides reasonable breaks for employees to express breast milk for one year after the child is born.

Community Action Partnership in Western Nebraska and Western Community Health Resources have been encouraging breastfeeding by providing breastfeeding peer support for their clients.

Since new mothers’ preferred resource for questions about child rearing is other mothers, the peer support is provided by mothers who have experience with breastfeeding and have undergone specific training, and encourages and supports both pregnant women and those who have already started breastfeeding. Individual counseling and mother-to-mother support groups are also offered.  Since women’s social networks are highly influential, they can be good sources of encouragement for breastfeeding.

Box Butte General Hospital has made the comfort of nursing employees and patients a priority.

“At Box Butte General Hospital & Clinics we support breastfeeding because research indicates that both moms and babies are healthier throughout their lives as a result of breastfeeding.”  They have set aside a lactation room for nursing mothers who are either employees, patients, or visitors of the hospital.  The room provides a private, quiet space for mothers to breastfeed, as well as a pump and a refrigerator to store breast milk for later use. The hospital also offers a Breastfeeding Support Group for interested mothers that takes place in the Sand Hills Room in the Medical Arts Plaza, located at 2109 Box Butte Ave. The Support Group takes place on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:00 pm, and is led by two lactation counselors, Lisa Splattstoesser and Erica Muhr. For more information, contact Lisa at (308) 760-7558 or Erica at (308) 762-1774.

An important part of the Panhandle Community Health Improvement Plan is the encouragement of breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding has many advantages over feeding babies with formula. Some of these include a decrease in asthma and allergies in the baby, a decrease in obesity in the baby, a decrease in the weight put on by the mother because of the baby, and an increase in bonding between mother and child as oxytocin is released.  Mothers returning to work are presented with an additional barrier of expressing milk while away from their baby and returning to work is continually cited as the leading reason for mothers to wean their baby early.  To provide moms additional support, Chadron Community Hospital provides a room for employees to express their milk on paid break during the work day. 
This room includes a chair, sink, fridge, and pump for mothers to use. The hospital also gives a class on breastfeeding and its benefits to patients who are new mothers. One thing the hospital is working toward is more assistance for mothers after they have left the hospital. For more information, contact Rose Fryda, Infection Control Nurse.

Sidney Regional Medical Center – Employee breastfeeding room and policy

Breastfeeding-friendly worksites are not only in compliance with the Fair Labor Standards Act but provide an essential support for employees returning to work after having a baby. Sidney Regional Medical Center recently adopted a policy and created a room for nursing mothers. Additionally, the hospital is working diligently to make SRMC a baby-friendly hospital through the World Health Organization/UNICEF. For more information contact: Jessica Davies jdavies@pphd.org, 308-487-3600 ext 101.

To share your success story email kengel@pphd.org.

PRIORITY AREA: Healthy Living: Healthy Eating

  • Increase fruit and vegetable consumption
  • Decrease consumption of high energy dense foods
  • Decrease consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages

PRIORITY AREA: Healthy Living: Active Living

  • Increase physical activity
  • Decrease screen time (television, computers, electronic games, smart phones

PRIORITY AREA: Healthy Living: Breastfeeding

  • Increase breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity

 

  • Healthy Eating
  • Active Living
  • Breastfeeding

PRIORITY AREA: Healthy Living: Healthy Eating

Strategies

    • Improve the availability and access of affordable healthier foods and beverages, including fruits, vegetables, and water, in local retail venues and underserved areas.
    • Ensure access to and promote healthful foods, including fruits, vegetables, and water, while limiting access to sugar-sweetened beverages in worksite settings (food service, cafeteria, vending machines, meetings, conferences, and events).
    • Ensure that policies at school and child care facilities promote healthier foods and beverages, with an emphasis on fruits, vegetables, and healthy beverages/water.
    • Ensure that children in schools and child care facilities have affordable, appealing healthy choices in foods and beverages outside of the child nutrition program.
    • Implement and enhance clinical interventions to prevent and control obesity.

Measures

Objectives for Healthy Eating


O.1A.1

By July 31, 2017, decrease the proportion of Panhandle adults (18 years and older) who consume fruits and vegetables less than 1 time per day by 10%.

O.1A.2

By July 31, 2017, increase the proportion of Panhandle youth (students in grades 9-12) who consume 5 or more servings of fruits or vegetables per day by 10%.

O.1A.3

By July 31, 2017, decrease the proportion of Panhandle youth (students in grades 9-12) who drank sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) an average of one or more times per day during the past seven days by 10%.

O.1A.4

By July 31, 2017, decrease the proportion of adult (18 years or older) residents of the Nebraska Panhandle who consume sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) by 10%.

O.1A.5

By July 31, 2017, decrease the proportion of adolescent (students in grades 9-12) and adult (18 years or older) residents of the Nebraska Panhandle who are considered overweight or obese by 10%.

Performance Measures for Healthy Eating


P.1A.1

Increase number of community gardens and farmers markets.

P.1A.2

Increase number of seniors participating in the Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP).

P.1A.3

Increase number of coupons distributed as part of SFMNP.

P.1A.4

Increase number of Farmers Markets that accept Electronic Benefit Transfers.

P.1A.5

Increase percentage of worksites with policies or guidelines on healthful food options served at staff meetings.

P.1A.6

Increase percentage of worksites with policies encouraging healthy food at company sponsored events.

P.1A.7

Increase percentage of worksites with policies that require healthy food options in the cafeteria.

P.1A.8

Increase percentage of worksites that have posted signs to promote healthful food/beverage options or healthier food alternatives in vending machines.

P.1A.9

Increase percentage of worksites that make kitchen equipment available for employee food storage and cooking.

P.1A.10

Increase percentage of worksites that have offered employee health or wellness programs related to healthy eating or nutrition.

P.1A.11

Increase number of elementary and secondary schools that ever used the School Health index or other self-assessment tool to assess school policies, activities, and programs in nutrition.

P.1A.12

Increase number of Go NAP SACC trainers in the Panhandle.

P.1A.13

Increase number of NAP SACC trainings held annually.

P.1A.14

Increase number of National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) classes currently ongoing in calendar year.

P.1A.15

Increase number of NDPP participants.

Key Partners and Community Assets

  • NuVal Affiliated Food Stores
  • Local Bountiful Basket volunteer coordinators
  • Local Farmers Market vendors and organizers
  • City government for offering community garden space.
  • Panhandle Worksite Wellness Council Members
  • Clinical providers, local hospitals and organizations trained to provide NDPP classes
  • Area child care providers
  • Area schools
    • Schools that have adopted nutritional standards, or have included health-related goals and objectives on nutrition services and foods and beverages in School Improvement Plans
    • Schools that are implementing Coordinated School Health.  Area child care providers.
    • Schools implementing Coordinated School Health

 

PRIORITY AREA: Healthy Living: Active Living

Strategies

        • Enhance access to physical activity opportunities, including physical education in Panhandle schools, child care and after school facilities.
  • Enhance policies for physical activity, inclusive of physical education, in Nebraska schools.
  • Enhance community planning and design practices through built environment and policy changes to improve physical activity in Panhandle communities.
  • Enhance the parks and recreation built environment and policies to improve access to physical activity in the Panhandle.
  • Enhance worksite and healthcare supports for physical activity.

Measures

Objectives for Active Living


O.1B.1

By July 31, 2017, increase the proportion of adult (18 years or older) residents of the Panhandle who meet national guidelines for physical activity by 10%.

O.1B.2

By July 31, 2017, increase the proportion of Panhandle youth (students in grades 9-12) who reported being physically active for a total of at least 60 minutes/day on 5 or more of the past 7 days by 10%.

O.1B.3

By July 31, 2017, decrease the proportion of Panhandle youth (students in grades 9-12) who watch TV 3 or more hours per day by 10%.

O.1B.4

By July 31, 2017, decrease the proportion of Panhandle youth (students in grades 9-12) who report playing video or computer games (or using the computer for non-school work) for 3 or more hours per day by 10%.

O.1B.5

By July 31, 2017, decrease the proportion of Panhandle children ages 1 to 5 years who watch 1 or more hours of TV per day by 10%.

Performance Measures for Active Living


P.1B.1

Increase number of Health and Physical Activity Early Learning Guideline Sessions.

P.1B.2

Increase number of Health and Physical Activity Early Learning Guideline Session participants.

P.1B.3

Increase percentage of worksites that provide incentives to employees for engaging in physical activity or exercise.

P.1B.4

Increase percentage of worksites that have policies supporting employee physical fitness.

P.1B.5

Increase percentage of worksites that have policies encouraging employees to commute to work by walking or biking.

P.1B.6

Increase percentage of worksites that have one or more walking routes for employees.

P.1B.7

Increase percentage of worksites that post signs to promote use of stairs within worksite.

P.1B.8

Increase percentage of worksites that allow additional breaks during the day for physical activity.

P.1B.9

Increase percentage of worksites that provide subsidized memberships to health or fitness clubs.

P.1B.10

Increase percentage of worksites that allow flex time for physical activity during the workday.

P.1B.11

Increase number of communities with a transportation plan that promotes walking.

Key Partners and Community Assets

  • Area schools
    • Schools that have included health-related goals and objectives on physical activity in School Improvement Plans
    • Schools that are implementing Coordinated School Health
  • Area child care providers
  • Schools opening their gyms and playgrounds to community members through joint use agreements
  • Local governments including physical activity environmental supports in their comprehensive plans
  • City governments
  • Concerned citizens
  • Panhandle Worksite Wellness Council Members
  • Clinical providers, local hospitals and organizations trained to provide NDPP classes

 

PRIORITY AREA: Healthy Living: Breastfeeding

Strategies

  • Provide employers with resources and technical assistance to help them increase breastfeeding support in the workplace.
  • Promote and support peer and professional breastfeeding support programs.
  • Encourage hospitals to adopt maternity care practices supportive of breastfeeding.
  • Promote public support and acceptance of breastfeeding.

Measures

Objectives for Breastfeeding


O.1C.1

By July 31, 2017, increase the proportion of Panhandle infants who are ever breastfed by 10%.

O.1C.2

By July 31, 2017, increase the proportion of Panhandle infants who are breastfed at 12 months by 10%.

O.1C.3

By July 31, 2017, increase the proportion of Panhandle infants who are breastfed exclusively through 6 months by 10%.

Performance Measures for Breastfeeding


P.1C.1

Increase percentage of Panhandle businesses that have a written policy supporting breastfeeding.

P.1C.2

Increase percentage of businesses that provide a private, secure lactation room on site.

P.1C.3

Increase percentage of businesses that allow time in addition to normal breaks for lactating mothers to express breastmilk during the day.

P.1C.4

Increase percentage of worksites that have offered employees health or wellness programs, support groups, or counseling sessions related to breastfeeding/lactation.

P.1C.5

Increase number of International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in the Panhandle.

P.1C.6

Increase number of La Leche League Leaders in the Panhandle.

P.1C.7

Increase number of WIC peer counselors.

P.1C.8

Increase number of hospitals in the Panhandle that provide maternity care practices supportive of breastfeeding.

Key Partners and Community Assets

  • Breastfeeding friendly policies at worksites
    • Panhandle Worksite Wellness Council Members
    • Panhandle worksites
  • Community Action Partnership of Western Nebraska
  • Western Community Health Resources
  • La Leche League
  • Peer support through WIC agencies
  • Hospitals delivering babies that follow ten recommended practices and have a Certified Lactation Consultant on staff
    • Regional West Medical Center
    • Sidney Regional Medical Center
    • Box Butte General Hospital
    • Chadron Community Hospital

 

Page last reviewed: October 20, 2016
Page last updated: October 20, 2016
Content Source: 2015 CHIP Annual Report